Charlie Kaufman and Dan Harmon break Kickstarter record

On Sunday, Anomalisa became the most funded Kickstarter film ever.

The stop-motion animated movie—a collaboration between writer/director Charlie Kaufman and Community’s Dan Harmon and Dino Stamatopoulous that kicked off in July—raised $406,237 thanks to its 5,770 supporters.

Anomalisa barely surpassed The Gamers: Hands of Fate, the third installment in the role-playing-game-centric film series, which successfully raised $405,917.

On Sept. 6, the Anomalisa crew revealed in an update on their Kickstarter page that they were only $52,000 shy of the record. Intent on breaking the mark, the team asked its donors to increase their bids.
(continue)

Charlie Kaufman and Dan Harmon break Kickstarter record

On Sunday, Anomalisa became the most funded Kickstarter film ever.

The stop-motion animated movie—a collaboration between writer/director Charlie Kaufman and Community’s Dan Harmon and Dino Stamatopoulous that kicked off in July—raised $406,237 thanks to its 5,770 supporters.

Anomalisa barely surpassed The Gamers: Hands of Fate, the third installment in the role-playing-game-centric film series, which successfully raised $405,917.

On Sept. 6, the Anomalisa crew revealed in an update on their Kickstarter page that they were only $52,000 shy of the record. Intent on breaking the mark, the team asked its donors to increase their bids.
(continue)

Only 25 percent of Kickstarter projects deliver on time

Kickstarter success doesn’t depend on whether or not the project gets funded. It depends on whether or not the product gets delivered.

That’s the hypothesis surrounding the newest infographic from Appsblogger’s Jeanne Pi and Ethan Malick, a statistics professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. Together, the two offer an in-depth look at delivery success rates and what it takes to run a successful campaign from start to finish.(cont.)

Only 25 percent of Kickstarter projects deliver on time

Kickstarter success doesn’t depend on whether or not the project gets funded. It depends on whether or not the product gets delivered.

That’s the hypothesis surrounding the newest infographic from Appsblogger’s Jeanne Pi and Ethan Malick, a statistics professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. Together, the two offer an in-depth look at delivery success rates and what it takes to run a successful campaign from start to finish.
(cont.)

Penny Arcade’s new business model: Kickstarter

Since the early 2000’s, people have taken for granted that if they want to look at something on the Internet, it’s going to have ads plastered all over it.

Thirteen-year-old webcomic Penny Arcade wants to break this mold.

On Tuesday the comic’s writer and artist launched a Kickstarter which, if successful, will fund the site ad-free for a year. The pair are hoping to raise $1,000,000 from donors.

“What I’m saying is that we want to sell out, and we would love to sell out to you,” they wrote.

Artist Mike “Gabe” Krahulik announced on the Penny Arcade blog that the idea had come from a period in 2001 when they began running the comic entirely thanks to reader donations.

“You paid for our rent, food, video games and in return we made PA three times a week as well as a bunch of extra content. A lot has changed in eleven years. PA has fourteen employees now, we put on two massive conventions every year, we run a worldwide charity, we produce our own video games and web show. It’s a major operation now and running it off of donations again seems impossible. Or is it?”

It’s possible, but Krahulik said it’ll cost far more than it used to. The Kickstarter’s first monetary goal is $250,000, which will remove the main advertisement—the leaderboard—from the top of the website for a year. From there, twelve more goals follow, climaxing at $1,400,000.

To many readers, however, Penny Arcade is asking too much. Several referenced a 2011 comic, where Penny Arcade derided Kickstarter users for using the site for personal gain.

“Penny Arcade: May 2011: using Kickstarter for personal gains is awful… July 2012: uses Kickstarter for personal gains,” @kurafire tweeted.

“2012 biggest ‘not sure if serious’ moment: Penny Arcade Kickstarter,” @drjft wrote.

“I like Penny Arcade, but this Kickstarter seems incredibly misguided,” @gamejournos wrote.

Penny Arcade’s new business model: Kickstarter

Since the early 2000’s, people have taken for granted that if they want to look at something on the Internet, it’s going to have ads plastered all over it.

Thirteen-year-old webcomic Penny Arcade wants to break this mold.

On Tuesday the comic’s writer and artist launched a Kickstarter which, if successful, will fund the site ad-free for a year. The pair are hoping to raise $1,000,000 from donors.

“What I’m saying is that we want to sell out, and we would love to sell out to you,” they wrote.

Artist Mike “Gabe” Krahulik announced on the Penny Arcade blog that the idea had come from a period in 2001 when they began running the comic entirely thanks to reader donations.

“You paid for our rent, food, video games and in return we made PA three times a week as well as a bunch of extra content. A lot has changed in eleven years. PA has fourteen employees now, we put on two massive conventions every year, we run a worldwide charity, we produce our own video games and web show. It’s a major operation now and running it off of donations again seems impossible. Or is it?”

It’s possible, but Krahulik said it’ll cost far more than it used to. The Kickstarter’s first monetary goal is $250,000, which will remove the main advertisement—the leaderboard—from the top of the website for a year. From there, twelve more goals follow, climaxing at $1,400,000.

To many readers, however, Penny Arcade is asking too much. Several referenced a 2011 comic, where Penny Arcade derided Kickstarter users for using the site for personal gain.

“Penny Arcade: May 2011: using Kickstarter for personal gains is awful… July 2012: uses Kickstarter for personal gains,” @kurafire tweeted.

“2012 biggest ‘not sure if serious’ moment: Penny Arcade Kickstarter,” @drjft wrote.

“I like Penny Arcade, but this Kickstarter seems incredibly misguided,” @gamejournos wrote.

Kickstopper: A Motown tribute to Nickelback

Scott Bradlee is hardly what anyone would call a Nickelback fan.

“All I remember doing is changing the radio station every time I’d hear a Nickelback song come on,” Bradlee, a jazz musician in New York, told the Daily Dot. “I had no opinion. I didn’t even think of Nickelback.”

But then came November, when Nickelback, one of the most indescribably lame bands on the planet, was picked to play the halftime show of the Thanksgiving Day gridiron bash between the Detroit Lions and Green Bay Packers.

Stranger still, the game was being played in Detroit—Hitsville U.S.A.—the land of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, and the rest of the Motown legends.

This was not right, the people of Detroit valiantly declared. They even launched a petition, "The Detroit Lions: Replace Nickelback as the halftime show for the Thanksgiving Game," which gathered over 55,000 votes. But nothing changed; the Lions brass backed Nickelback.

Reading about the spout from his home in New York City’s Astoria neighborhood, Bradlee hatched the plan to blend the two sides together. Bradlee would merge the sounds of Nickelback and Motown together. He sat down and transcribed the band’s multiplatinum single “How You Remind Me” into a Motown song, repurposing the melody from guitar to piano and adding a horn section to convert on the crossover.



Bradlee posted the video to YouTube just before Nickelback took the Ford Field stage on Thanksgiving Day. Titled “A Motown Tribute to Nickelback,” the video went viral, racking up over 120,000 views. It now sits at 230,000 views and has helped earn Bradlee and his buddies a trip out to British Columbia in August, where A Motown Tribute to Nickelback will perform alongside artists like Charles Bradley, Chromeo, and the Tragically Hip at Virgin Mobile’s Live at Squamish music festival. Bradlee agreed—despite the fact that the tribute had only had one song.

“Now the question becomes, what happens if we decide to become a real band?” Bradlee explained to the Daily Dot. It appears we’re likely to find out.

Bradlee and his bandmates are committed to developing a full set of Motown variations on Nickelback for their Squamish show, but the group wants to make it more than just a one-shot deal. They actually want to cut a full-length album of repurposed Nickelback tracks, one for every track in the band’s seven-album catalog.

“Some songs do lend themselves to Motown a little bit better than others, but we haven’t found a song that’s stumped us yet. There’s such a rich history of Motown going through the early 1960s and through the Soul Train era, we can always find something that’ll work.”

Recently, the group launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise the $3,000 necessary to pay for studio time and song licensing fees. With 12 days left, Bradlee and his cohorts are still $1,500 short, but that’s done little to delay the effort. As Bradlee notes in the project’s video, the crew’s already handled two of the most important parts of becoming a band, “taking pretentious band photos” and setting up a Facebook page.

“Nickelback is about all I’ve been listening to. We’ve been digging on ‘Lullaby,’ their new song. And we’re really excited about ‘Rock Star.’ My dream is that any time Nickelback records a song, A Motown Tribute to Nickelback will record that same song.”

Chad Kroeger and the boys in Nickelback are on tour through the summer but should start work on their eighth album shortly after touching down in Canada this fall. Sounds like Scott Bradlee better get ready.

 

Kickstopper: A Motown Tribute to Nickelback

Location: New York City, N.Y.
Summary: A pianist in Astoria wants to record an album of Nickelback songs in the Motown style
Goal: $3,000
Amount raised of press time: $1,486
Days left: 12
Best buy: For $50, A Motown Tribute to Nickelback will call you and sing Nickelback songs in the Motown style. Backers will also get an autographed copy of the album upon completion.

Kickstopper: A Motown tribute to Nickelback

Scott Bradlee is hardly what anyone would call a Nickelback fan.

“All I remember doing is changing the radio station every time I’d hear a Nickelback song come on,” Bradlee, a jazz musician in New York, told the Daily Dot. “I had no opinion. I didn’t even think of Nickelback.”

But then came November, when Nickelback, one of the most indescribably lame bands on the planet, was picked to play the halftime show of the Thanksgiving Day gridiron bash between the Detroit Lions and Green Bay Packers.

Stranger still, the game was being played in Detroit—Hitsville U.S.A.—the land of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, and the rest of the Motown legends.

This was not right, the people of Detroit valiantly declared. They even launched a petition, "The Detroit Lions: Replace Nickelback as the halftime show for the Thanksgiving Game," which gathered over 55,000 votes. But nothing changed; the Lions brass backed Nickelback.

Reading about the spout from his home in New York City’s Astoria neighborhood, Bradlee hatched the plan to blend the two sides together. Bradlee would merge the sounds of Nickelback and Motown together. He sat down and transcribed the band’s multiplatinum single “How You Remind Me” into a Motown song, repurposing the melody from guitar to piano and adding a horn section to convert on the crossover.

Bradlee posted the video to YouTube just before Nickelback took the Ford Field stage on Thanksgiving Day. Titled “A Motown Tribute to Nickelback,” the video went viral, racking up over 120,000 views. It now sits at 230,000 views and has helped earn Bradlee and his buddies a trip out to British Columbia in August, where A Motown Tribute to Nickelback will perform alongside artists like Charles Bradley, Chromeo, and the Tragically Hip at Virgin Mobile’s Live at Squamish music festival. Bradlee agreed—despite the fact that the tribute had only had one song.

“Now the question becomes, what happens if we decide to become a real band?” Bradlee explained to the Daily Dot. It appears we’re likely to find out.

Bradlee and his bandmates are committed to developing a full set of Motown variations on Nickelback for their Squamish show, but the group wants to make it more than just a one-shot deal. They actually want to cut a full-length album of repurposed Nickelback tracks, one for every track in the band’s seven-album catalog.

“Some songs do lend themselves to Motown a little bit better than others, but we haven’t found a song that’s stumped us yet. There’s such a rich history of Motown going through the early 1960s and through the Soul Train era, we can always find something that’ll work.”

Recently, the group launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise the $3,000 necessary to pay for studio time and song licensing fees. With 12 days left, Bradlee and his cohorts are still $1,500 short, but that’s done little to delay the effort. As Bradlee notes in the project’s video, the crew’s already handled two of the most important parts of becoming a band, “taking pretentious band photos” and setting up a Facebook page.

“Nickelback is about all I’ve been listening to. We’ve been digging on ‘Lullaby,’ their new song. And we’re really excited about ‘Rock Star.’ My dream is that any time Nickelback records a song, A Motown Tribute to Nickelback will record that same song.”

Chad Kroeger and the boys in Nickelback are on tour through the summer but should start work on their eighth album shortly after touching down in Canada this fall. Sounds like Scott Bradlee better get ready.

Kickstopper: A Motown Tribute to Nickelback

Location: New York City, N.Y.
Summary: A pianist in Astoria wants to record an album of Nickelback songs in the Motown style
Goal: $3,000
Amount raised of press time: $1,486
Days left: 12
Best buy: For $50, A Motown Tribute to Nickelback will call you and sing Nickelback songs in the Motown style. Backers will also get an autographed copy of the album upon completion.

Kickstopper: “Lunar Aid 1985,” a $21 million space folk album recorded on the moon

Could Muddy Waters have played the blues so well if he’d never been through Mississippi? Could Bob Dylan have written so poignantly about 4th Street if he’d never set foot in Greenwich Village?

The answer to those questions is a definitive “no,” a truth that poses an interesting dilemma for Jim MacKenzie and Sarah Giavedoni, the wildly inventive duo behind comedic blog Stuff Monsters Like.

That’s because the tandem wants to record the first-ever space folk album, a collection of songs that’s indigenous to the interstellar universe and all the planets, stars, and objects therein.

But in order to do this, MacKenzie and Giavedoni have to go to the moon. The two say it’s absolutely necessary in order to make Lunar Aid 1985 the truest representation of space’s native sound.  

“We still don’t know what space folk music actually is,” MacKenzie told the Daily Dot from his home in Asheville, N.C.

“But we do know that we want to be the Bob Dylans of space. We just haven’t made it there yet.”

MacKenzie insists that the duo is “dead serious about this,” though the cost of sending two citizens to the moon to record an album of folk music is certainly more than what two can make on a blog’s payroll.

MacKenzie and Giavedoni ultimately decided to launch a Kickstarter campaign, Space Folk Album: Lunar Aid 1985. The total funding that they set out to raise: $21,474,836—the greatest sum that a project creator is allowed to raise on the crowdfunding platform.

“We tried to raise $578 billion, but they wouldn’t let us,” Giavedoni said. “I put in five, seven, eight, comma, zero, zero, zero, zero, zero, zero, zero, zero, zero, and it said that you cannot put in more than ‘this amount.’ So we put in this amount.”

Now, wait. I know what you’re thinking: A Kickstarter campaign to raise $21 million so that two jokers from North Carolina can launch into space, land on the moon, and then record an album of space folk music… and Kickstarter approved it? Turns out getting that approval was easier than you think.

“This is a creative project,” Giovedoni explained. “Our goal is to get to the moon so that we can properly make this album. We went through the rules very carefully and that met all of their guidelines. We had to adjust our goal, but once we did, Kickstarter sent us an email that said, ‘Good luck to you.’”

OK, so it’s on. And with eight days left in the campaign, MacKenzie and Giovedoni are sitting pretty. With $4,533 raised, the two are just $21,470,303 away from reaching their funding goal and blasting. We’re thinking they have a chance, if only some great visionary would lend a helping hand.

“We’re trying to get this in front of Richard Branson,” MacKenzie said. “We think he’d love it.

“The thing about Richard Branson is that he could write a check for $21 million this afternoon and not even miss it. He’d miss dinner. I would be happy to take $21 million from Richard Branson—Sir Richard Branson.”

Richard Branson, if you’re out there, quit grooming your perfectly flowing coif for a minute and help these people out! They need $21 million.

 

Kickstopper: Space Folk Album: Lunar Aid 1985

Location: Asheville, N.C.
Summary: Two songwriters in Asheville, N.C., want to fly to the moon to record the first-ever space folk album.
Goal: $21,474,836
Amount raised of press time: $4,533
Days left: 8
Best buy: For $500, MacKenzie and Giovedoni will build a statue of you on a moon crater.

Kickstopper: “Lunar Aid 1985,” a $21 million space folk album recorded on the moon

Could Muddy Waters have played the blues so well if he’d never been through Mississippi? Could Bob Dylan have written so poignantly about 4th Street if he’d never set foot in Greenwich Village?

The answer to those questions is a definitive “no,” a truth that poses an interesting dilemma for Jim MacKenzie and Sarah Giavedoni, the wildly inventive duo behind comedic blog Stuff Monsters Like.

That’s because the tandem wants to record the first-ever space folk album, a collection of songs that’s indigenous to the interstellar universe and all the planets, stars, and objects therein.

But in order to do this, MacKenzie and Giavedoni have to go to the moon. The two say it’s absolutely necessary in order to make Lunar Aid 1985 the truest representation of space’s native sound.

“We still don’t know what space folk music actually is,” MacKenzie told the Daily Dot from his home in Asheville, N.C.

“But we do know that we want to be the Bob Dylans of space. We just haven’t made it there yet.”

MacKenzie insists that the duo is “dead serious about this,” though the cost of sending two citizens to the moon to record an album of folk music is certainly more than what two can make on a blog’s payroll.

MacKenzie and Giavedoni ultimately decided to launch a Kickstarter campaign, Space Folk Album: Lunar Aid 1985. The total funding that they set out to raise: $21,474,836—the greatest sum that a project creator is allowed to raise on the crowdfunding platform.

“We tried to raise $578 billion, but they wouldn’t let us,” Giavedoni said. “I put in five, seven, eight, comma, zero, zero, zero, zero, zero, zero, zero, zero, zero, and it said that you cannot put in more than ‘this amount.’ So we put in this amount.”

Now, wait. I know what you’re thinking: A Kickstarter campaign to raise $21 million so that two jokers from North Carolina can launch into space, land on the moon, and then record an album of space folk music… and Kickstarter approved it? Turns out getting that approval was easier than you think.

“This is a creative project,” Giovedoni explained. “Our goal is to get to the moon so that we can properly make this album. We went through the rules very carefully and that met all of their guidelines. We had to adjust our goal, but once we did, Kickstarter sent us an email that said, ‘Good luck to you.’”

OK, so it’s on. And with eight days left in the campaign, MacKenzie and Giovedoni are sitting pretty. With $4,533 raised, the two are just $21,470,303 away from reaching their funding goal and blasting. We’re thinking they have a chance, if only some great visionary would lend a helping hand.

“We’re trying to get this in front of Richard Branson,” MacKenzie said. “We think he’d love it.

“The thing about Richard Branson is that he could write a check for $21 million this afternoon and not even miss it. He’d miss dinner. I would be happy to take $21 million from Richard Branson—Sir Richard Branson.”

Richard Branson, if you’re out there, quit grooming your perfectly flowing coif for a minute and help these people out! They need $21 million.

Kickstopper: Space Folk Album: Lunar Aid 1985

Location: Asheville, N.C. Summary: Two songwriters in Asheville, N.C., want to fly to the moon to record the first-ever space folk album. Goal: $21,474,836 Amount raised of press time: $4,533 Days left: 8 Best buy: For $500, MacKenzie and Giovedoni will build a statue of you on a moon crater.

Retired soldier turns to Kickstarter to tell an untold war story

Sgt. Konrad Ludwig left his home when he was 17 years old so that he could serve in the military.

It was what he thought was right, he said. He wanted to stand up for what he believed in. By the time he was 19, he had earned his place as the gun team leader in an urban assault Stryker unit known as Bull Company.

Bull Company had one mission when it deployed to Afghanistan in Aug. 2007: to run a series of kill-or-capture raids in a district of Baghdad known as Sadr City that eventually resulted in the hunting down of a number of high-value targets in the Mahdi Army. The team was given 15 months.

On March 23, in the middle of the 15-month mission, one of the largest and bloodiest battles of the war broke out in the middle of Sadr City. The Madhi Army rose up to overthrow the occupation, and Bull Company’s rules of engagement were lifted.

“Open street fighting lasted for nearly three months,” Ludwig wrote in an Reddit IAmA on Friday. “Thousands of people were killed and wounded,” including more than 200 American soldiers and countless Afghani civilians.

But news of the Sadr City uprising never made its way back home to the United States. Instead, Ludwig saw the papers around the country run headlines on American Idol, Twilight, and Elliot Spitzer getting caught with a prostitute.

Today, Ludwig owns a private publishing company, and he’s written a book about Sadr City in hopes that his story will soon be heard. Called Stryker: The Siege of Sadr City, the tome is a first-hand account of what happened in those streets during the final battle for Baghdad.

“It began as a confession, a letter to old friends, and an attempt to confront the things that I had experienced,” he wrote.

“My initial goal was to shed some light on what happened, the things I had to do, and why I’ll never be the same. As the project unfolded, however, it turned out that there was much more at stake than my own well-being.”

Manuscript in hand, Ludwig turned to Kickstarter to help turn the book from paper to product. He set his funding goal at $15,000, a figure that he considered enough to help him publish and distribute the book, organize a publicity campaign, and embark on a national tour.

Ludwig met his goal in the campaign’s first day.

With three days left in funding, Ludwig’s already managed to raise more than $30,000. Today’s been his biggest day yet, thanks in part to his sprawling Reddit IAmA, which has brought in over 2,500 comments.

“Right now it’s all about volume,” Ludwig wrote to his backers a day after the project met its funding goal. “The money we raise will go a long way towards marketing this book and pushing our story out to the world, but the biggest priority is to get as many people as possible aware of the project and eager to get their hands on a copy.”

Retired soldier turns to Kickstarter to tell an untold war story

Sgt. Konrad Ludwig left his home when he was 17 years old so that he could serve in the military.

It was what he thought was right, he said. He wanted to stand up for what he believed in. By the time he was 19, he had earned his place as the gun team leader in an urban assault Stryker unit known as Bull Company.

Bull Company had one mission when it deployed to Afghanistan in Aug. 2007: to run a series of kill-or-capture raids in a district of Baghdad known as Sadr City that eventually resulted in the hunting down of a number of high-value targets in the Mahdi Army. The team was given 15 months.

On March 23, in the middle of the 15-month mission, one of the largest and bloodiest battles of the war broke out in the middle of Sadr City. The Madhi Army rose up to overthrow the occupation, and Bull Company’s rules of engagement were lifted.

“Open street fighting lasted for nearly three months,” Ludwig wrote in an Reddit IAmA on Friday. “Thousands of people were killed and wounded,” including more than 200 American soldiers and countless Afghani civilians.

But news of the Sadr City uprising never made its way back home to the United States. Instead, Ludwig saw the papers around the country run headlines on American Idol, Twilight, and Elliot Spitzer getting caught with a prostitute.

Today, Ludwig owns a private publishing company, and he’s written a book about Sadr City in hopes that his story will soon be heard. Called Stryker: The Siege of Sadr City, the tome is a first-hand account of what happened in those streets during the final battle for Baghdad.

“It began as a confession, a letter to old friends, and an attempt to confront the things that I had experienced,” he wrote.

“My initial goal was to shed some light on what happened, the things I had to do, and why I’ll never be the same. As the project unfolded, however, it turned out that there was much more at stake than my own well-being.”

Manuscript in hand, Ludwig turned to Kickstarter to help turn the book from paper to product. He set his funding goal at $15,000, a figure that he considered enough to help him publish and distribute the book, organize a publicity campaign, and embark on a national tour.

Ludwig met his goal in the campaign’s first day.

With three days left in funding, Ludwig’s already managed to raise more than $30,000. Today’s been his biggest day yet, thanks in part to his sprawling Reddit IAmA, which has brought in over 2,500 comments.

“Right now it’s all about volume,” Ludwig wrote to his backers a day after the project met its funding goal. “The money we raise will go a long way towards marketing this book and pushing our story out to the world, but the biggest priority is to get as many people as possible aware of the project and eager to get their hands on a copy.”

Infographic: Nearly half of Kickstarter projects fail

Kickstarter has long reveled in its ability to fund people’s creative dreams, but the popular crowdfunding platform has been just as quick to conceal information about projects that fail to receive funding on its site.

According to data compiled by AppsBlogger.com, those failures are much more common than you would think.

Over 41 percent of all proposed Kickstarter projects fail to meet their funding goals, the site reported in an infographic last week. The figure amounts to a total number of failed projects in excess of 18,000.

Kickstarter’s conversion rate is notable in itself, but the specifics behind which projects fail is also worthy of a look. On average, failed projects set their funding targets $11,000 higher—$16,365 to $5,487—than projects that do meet their goals.

Oddly enough, it’s the shorter campaigns that have more success getting funded. The average successful project raised pledges for 38 days. Unsuccessful projects remained active for 43 days, on average.

"I believe there’s value in understanding failure," wrote Jeanne Pi, the woman behind the infographic. "In this case, failure to get fully-funded in a Kickstarter campaign."

Infographic: Nearly half of Kickstarter projects fail

Kickstarter has long reveled in its ability to fund people’s creative dreams, but the popular crowdfunding platform has been just as quick to conceal information about projects that fail to receive funding on its site.

According to data compiled by AppsBlogger.com, those failures are much more common than you would think.

Over 41 percent of all proposed Kickstarter projects fail to meet their funding goals, the site reported in an infographic last week. The figure amounts to a total number of failed projects in excess of 18,000.

Kickstarter’s conversion rate is notable in itself, but the specifics behind which projects fail is also worthy of a look. On average, failed projects set their funding targets $11,000 higher—$16,365 to $5,487—than projects that do meet their goals.

Oddly enough, it’s the shorter campaigns that have more success getting funded. The average successful project raised pledges for 38 days. Unsuccessful projects remained active for 43 days, on average.

"I believe there’s value in understanding failure," wrote Jeanne Pi, the woman behind the infographic. "In this case, failure to get fully-funded in a Kickstarter campaign."